Photo of Chao Wang

王超 Chao Wang

Jolley Hall, Room 507
One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130
chaowang@wustl.edu


I am a fifth year computer science Ph.D. student at Washington University in St. Louis, working in real-time cyber-physical systems research with Dr. Chris Gill and Dr. Chenyang Lu.

Current Research Topic

Real-time cyber-physical event processing

An essential part of cyber-physical systems.

Previous Research Topics

Safety software systems for self-driving cars

I studied safe software systems interaction for self-driving cars. Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), for example, is a self-driving feature that maintains a safe distance to the leading car by managing the vehicle speed. Unintended interactions between self-driving features may occur, however, in situations such as driving on a curvy road. Changing vehicle speed may cause oversteering/understeering in the presence of another self-driving feature, called Lane-Keeping Control (LKC), which tries to steer the vehicle to make it stay in the current lane.

Fortunately, there are ways to identify such interactions (e.g., ACC vs. LKC) at the design time of the self-driving features. But since at run-time some identified interactions rarely happen (which is a good thing though), it may be an overkill if we build a system that aggressively guards those conditions (for example, by restricting the allowed vehicle speed every time both ACC and LKC are functioning). A way to improve the situation is to check those rare conditions at run-time and respond with verified consolidating strategies.

Networked virtual worlds

I worked with Dr. Jon Turner on building a scalable networked virtual world, an application of the Forest overlay network. Shown below, our application aims to allow people to join a 3D virtual environment and effectively interact with others. I was working on enabling thousands of avatars to communicate within a local area (e.g., where they can see each other). This includes the design of a scalable networking architecture as well as the study of efficient multicast communcation mechanisms.

Photo of our vworld app

Before coming to Washington University, I was with the Dependable Computing Laboratory at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan.

Publications

1. C. H. Chou, K. F. Ssu, H. C. Jiau, W. T. Wang, C. Wang, "A Dead-End Free Topology Maintenance Protocol for Geographic Forwarding in Wireless Sensor Networks," IEEE Transactions on Computers, vol. 60, no. 11, pp. 1610-1621, Nov. 2011.

2. C. Wang, K. F. Ssu, "A Distributed Collision-Free Low-Latency Link Scheduling Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks," Proceedings of the IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference, Apr. 2010.

3. C. Wang, "Low-Latency Link Scheduling in Wireless Sensor Networks", Master Thesis, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, June 2010. (pdf)

Presentations

1. "Scalable Network Architecture in Virtual World Applications," Doctoral Seminar Series, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, Oct. 2013. (video), (slide)

2. "Building Scalable Networked Virtual Worlds," Oral Qualifying Examination Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, Sep. 2013. (slide)

3. "From MMO to Virtual World Networking," Research Seminar on Networking and Communications, Washington University in St. Louis, Feb. 2013. (slide)

4. "A Distributed Collision-Free Low-Latency Link Scheduling Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks," IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference, Sydney, Australia, Apr. 2010. (slide)


Last update: Apr. 2017